Continual tensions exist between our desire for territory and our subtle co-existence with the land in which conflict for territory takes place. The Rondebosch Common is a case in hand. The 100 Year Anniversary of the 1913 Land Act has brought with it fevered discussion, debate and activism as lawmakers and citizens alike rethink their rights to the land and their responsibilities for it. Perhaps, as suggested by Robert Pogue Harrison, a ‘vocation of care’ can equip us with new insights into the weighty arguments that surround areas of common ground such as the Rondebosch Common.

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Mandela at City Hall
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Amy Balkin, This is the Public Domain, 2003+ This is the Public Domain is an ongoing effort to create a permanent shared international commons, free to all in perpetuity, on 2.64 acres of land near Mojave, CA.
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Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree for Washington, D.C. 2007
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Aerial View of Rondebosch Common
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